I've got an LCD that is no longer in use and would like to put it to use in a project. I've got all the parts that came with it, but don't know where to begin. I've stripped it of it's plastics and have it down to the LCD and the controller board. I have the ribbon cable as well. How could I go about testing this LCD to find which pins do what? I know most of the obvious answers are going to be to look for the data sheet, but the LCD itself doesn't appear to have a brand of any sort. Any advice on how to begin testing this out to see if it works would be greatly appreciated. 

Thanks in advance!

Tags: Arduino, LCD, Testing

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Adan,

Where this LCD came from? Is it a TFT? What size?

If can post a picture, it helps a lot.

Usually, small LCDs have about 45 pins. Among them, the most important ones are Hsync, Vsync, Clock, Vcc, GND, LedA, LedK, and about 24 RGB bits, 8 for each color.

The LCDs I have already worked on, operated in 3.3V, so be careful about that. The backlight on the other hand, may need more, like 19-20V.

Good luck!

Datasheet would be soooo helpful! :(

Not a chance?

Marcelo,

I will try and get as much info on it as possible and take some pics when I get home. As far as I know, it's an LCD that was pulled from a digital picture frame. Thanks for the response!

- Adan

Sorry, I haven't had much time to upload the pictures. I will see if I can upload them this evening.

I have a similar problem with a screen I took out of an old word processor. The connector for the LCD board only has 12 pins, and it has six OKI MSM5922A 80-dot LCD segment drivers. The word processor itself has a Z80-type CPU, so I'm pretty sure any of the common MCUs should be able to run it. I've looked online before and only found two posts with people asking how to use this display... not a lot of help when I'm asking the same question! Anyway, good luck to you. I'd be interested to hear about your progress with your LCD.

Does it have any information on it?

I think it's a great shame there isn't some database being built to help with this sort of thing.

For example I have  a Brother DCP585CW printer in which the colour screen works fine although the printer itself has failed.

i also have a Video recorder, a DVD player and a few cordless phones with screens which still work. It would be great if I could get any of them to work with my arduino.

If I get any working I would be happy to post the details but where would be the best place to put them?

"I think it's a great shame there isn't some database being built to help with this sort of thing."

 

That would be a great resource to have.

If it hasn't happened by the time I get some free time to look into this, I may have to start something like that.

Christmas is coming soon, hope you happy, of course, happy Christmas gift or to choose a digital photo frame, are interested can go to my blog to have a look. http://www.digitalframe8.com/blog/

Sorry for the delayed response as I have been quite busy as of late. Here are three of the images. I have more images of the chips on the board as well if you would like me to upload them. Let me know what you think, Marcelo. Thanks.

Attachments:

Myson Century, Inc., says that the CS5845J (the big chip in the middle) is a "TTL interfaced TFT LCD Timing Controller" that supports resolutions up to 1024x600.  The CS5843 is similar (but obviously different) and has a paltry datasheet available.  This dude is selling a Phillips digital picture frame that uses this LCD and he has a bunch of pictures of the pieces and chips.

I don't know how much research you've done online (loads, I'd assume) so I hope that I'm not telling you a bunch of stuff you already know.  I did notice that most of the pins on that connector don't look used.  If you have the rest of the pieces of this device, you may need to map out the connections on a graph.  Also you could use a logic analyzer or oscilloscope to spy on the data that the original controller is sending the LCD to get an idea of what's going on.  If you map out the connections and have some information about the controller (like its datasheet) you might be able to figure out the pins, but then that still leaves the protocol.  As you can see from the Myson website, the LCD chip has quite a few options about how it displays (resolution, dithering, inverted input).  My guess is that the datasheet for this chip is proprietary and they won't give it to you.  Their contact us page almost plainly says, "don't contact us with individual concerns."

Anyway, I hope that some of my research helps.

Your research helps greatly! Thanks, Jonathan! I should be getting my logic analyzer here pretty soon, as I do not have an oscilloscope available to me. And, no, I had not done too much digging around for info on this at all. I'm typically good about finding that info myself, but my intentions of this post was more to seek guidance or a push in the right direction to figuring this out. That definitely should have been the first thing on my list to do, though.

Thanks again for your help. I suppose I've got a head start on how to get the ball rolling here. If I run into any other questions, I will definitely post here for help!

Make sure you keep us up to date on your progress!  I think you have an uphill battle ahead of you, but it sounds like you have the tools and skills to come out successful.  I'm anxious to know what you learn about the protocol the controller uses.  Maybe you can be the first to write an open-source library for it!

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